Embers of the Soul

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Embers of the Soul – Southern Skyes – Book Four

The deep secrets woven amidst the branches of the McCabe and Skye family trees have been hidden for years until now. More quickly than shifting sands on the shores of Tasmania, these family secrets are tumbling forth with unleashed fury. All of this immensely displeases the egocentric elder brother Griff McCabe, who has spent a lifetime carefully plotting to protect the family name from the disgraces of the past—and in his eyes, the worst of all—the drops of aboriginal blood that course through the roots of the ancestral tree. Now, as tragedy befalls younger brother, Hawkin McCabe, and the next generation matures, those branches are breaking. The wounds have voices, revealing the true ties that bind the McCabes and the Skyes . . . and the one soldier who started it all many generations ago.

Available now on most outlets !

Amazon – Kobo – Barnes & Noble – Via the publisher (print copies)

Embers of the Soul

imageWin a free book! 

In celebrating the upcoming release of book four in the Southern Skyes series, we’re offering a free autographed copy of “Embers of the Soul” to our lucky winner (worldwide airmail).   The runner-up will receive a free ebook.

Go to: http://on.fb.me/1l9jCep

A New Name for Book Four in the Southern Skyes series

Well folks, it’s back to the drawing-board with regard to the title for the fourth book in the Southern Skyes series because the name I originally selected, “Burnt Wattle”, has proven to be somewhat inappropriate. Since choosing the name I’ve learnt that “wattle” doesn’t always mean what we here in Australia generally consider it to mean.

Golden Wattle is the floral emblem of Australia, hence most of us Down Under think of wattle as a medium-sized acacia tree with very fragrant, intensely yellow flowers in globular heads.

Golden Wattle

Golden Wattle

Another definition of “wattle” with which we are mostly familiar relates to a construction of poles intertwined with twigs, reeds or branches, used for walls, fences, and roofs. Hence wattle-and-daub; a method our pioneer forbears often used.

But these definitions are far from universal . . . and therein lies my problem.

In North America a “wattle” is recognised as a fleshy pendulous process, usually about the head or neck (as of a bird, e.g. a turkey) or around the chin and stomach of some unfortunate humans as they age, the latter sometimes also being called a “lappet”.

So, now, when we think of “Burnt Wattle” in that light, it does tend to bring forth a smile and a chuckle.

Watch this space for the new title of book four in Southern Skyes.

Photo: Australian National Botanic Gardens